spectacletheater:

Marguerite Duras’ rarely seen Baxter, Vera Baxter, 10:00 tonight, Monday, April 21, and one last time next tuesday.


How did Kalb endure the inconclusive events of his brain? The word fragments that were caught incessantly by his ear, his absorption of idiosyncratic time, bits of incidents, snippets of events? What made him suffer through this uninterrupted series of fragments? What made him experience these agonizing circumstances as normal?
Gerhard Roth, The Will to Sickness, 1973.

by the way, i only dare ingest small homeopathic doses of perceptions into my organism — a prearranged number of glittering eye and ear drops, as it were — the origin of these notes. i am preparing a slow disintegration of the external world inside my head, a dissolution of the persistence of this enforced perceptual automatism.
Gerhard Roth, The Autobiography of Albert Einstein, 1972.

spectacletheater:

Tonight, Thursday April 17, 7:30: Marguerite Duras’ Destroy She Said. See it, it’s a gorgeous enigmatic film.

(Plays again at 10:00, Tuesday, April 29)


todf:

spectacletheater:

Empty beachscapes, vacant hotels, and Bulle Ogier in Marguerite Duras’ exquisitely minimal yet engrossing Agatha et les lectures illimitees.

Plays tonight, Monday, April 14, 10:00!

And again, Sunday, April 27, 7:30.

you really should come out for these, they’re amazing. 

Seriously, I’ve never been so gripped by long, desolate beach-shots with elliptic dialogue.


Joanna Russ’ 1968 debut Picnic on Paradise (1979 Berkley edition). As is all too often the case, I can’t  seem to locate the cover artist for this one (though the great Leo & Diane Dillon did one of the other editions…)

Joanna Russ’ 1968 debut Picnic on Paradise (1979 Berkley edition). As is all too often the case, I can’t  seem to locate the cover artist for this one (though the great Leo & Diane Dillon did one of the other editions…)


A kinetic head-launch from Jeremy Sorese’s Blindspot. Found in a pile of old Xeric grant submissions at Desert Island, easily the most eye-catching of the bunch.

A kinetic head-launch from Jeremy Sorese’s Blindspot. Found in a pile of old Xeric grant submissions at Desert Island, easily the most eye-catching of the bunch.


Original 1969 mass market paperback cover for Ishmael Reed’s manic satire of an amok dystopian America, The Freelance Pallbearers (originally 1967).

Original 1969 mass market paperback cover for Ishmael Reed’s manic satire of an amok dystopian America, The Freelance Pallbearers (originally 1967).


Brittany Hague in that latest 3-volume Monster from Hidden Fortress. Only 400 of these printed, but they’re still available.

Brittany Hague in that latest 3-volume Monster from Hidden Fortress. Only 400 of these printed, but they’re still available.


An excellently-designed Edie Fake creepout in Monster.
Lots more Fake in the Expansive Mouthfeel archives.

An excellently-designed Edie Fake creepout in Monster.

Lots more Fake in the Expansive Mouthfeel archives.


Original Bantam mass market paperback of Joanna Russ’ The Female Man (selected by Frederick Pohl alongside Samuel Delaney’s Dhalgren among others!)
If you’re me, which I am, this will have almost everything you’re looking for in science fiction: post-modern experimentation, sharp social discourse (here, on gender identity), flights of surrealism, and amazing 70s psychedelia cover design.

Original Bantam mass market paperback of Joanna Russ’ The Female Man (selected by Frederick Pohl alongside Samuel Delaney’s Dhalgren among others!)

If you’re me, which I am, this will have almost everything you’re looking for in science fiction: post-modern experimentation, sharp social discourse (here, on gender identity), flights of surrealism, and amazing 70s psychedelia cover design.


Detail from Garrett Young's inner/outer space voyage in Jeans 2.
Much more Garrett Young excellence in the Expansive Mouthfeel Archives.

Detail from Garrett Young's inner/outer space voyage in Jeans 2.

Much more Garrett Young excellence in the Expansive Mouthfeel Archives.


The prismatic cover art for John Pham’s Epoxy #4.

The prismatic cover art for John Pham’s Epoxy #4.


Her most overtly avant-garde feature besides Daisies, Vera Chytilova’s Fruit of Paradise is a lavish thriller of multiplying associations and conflicting imagery, set in a postmodern eden. Dead this week at 85, Chytilova leaves us with an irreparable absence, but nonetheless with one of the most formidable bodies of work in world cinema.


spectacletheater:

RIP Vera Chytilova.

Stills from her elegantly dual-tracked first feature, Something Different.

Seriously, this one makes me so sad.